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SHO-moco

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So I just picked up a high mileage 2010 SHO without PP. So I am saying hello and will be asking for tips and tricks along the way. Step one, engine, trans, and PTU replacement. I bought the car knowing the engine was pretty much shot, didn't know the transmission in it doesn't even belong in the car. Has an AA8P-7000-JA transmission in it that as I understand is supposed to be for Naturally aspirated 3.5's. Regardless I will be doing the transmission as well. Have a DA5P-7000-BB (yes the 2.77 ratio)out of a 2015 SHO with 52k on it ordered. Also have a 92k PP motor from a 2015 sho on order. Picking up a 50k mile PTU as well, non PP version.

I decided to go with the PP motor for the stronger piston setup, and they were more readily available then a 2010-2012 setup. Plan to just switch the oil filter housing from the old motor to the new as I will not be running an oil cooler (Yes yes, I'm an ACC kinda guy lol). Engine will go on the stand and get a new timing chain set, water pump, and HV oil pump from Melling's before the engine gets installed in the car. I am aware of some sensor switching over and a tone ring as well. But fingers crossed for a smooth operation. Biggest hurdle for me will be learning some FORScan so I can make sure the computer and transmission are properly identified and to clear out any tunes that might have been put in the car over the year. Plan is to run stock, I like a sleeper but don't need anything racing oriented.
 

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Ta2dResqr

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So I just picked up a high mileage 2010 SHO without PP. So I am saying hello and will be asking for tips and tricks along the way. Step one, engine, trans, and PTU replacement. I bought the car knowing the engine was pretty much shot, didn't know the transmission in it doesn't even belong in the car. Has an AA8P-7000-JA transmission in it that as I understand is supposed to be for Naturally aspirated 3.5's. Regardless I will be doing the transmission as well. Have a DA5P-7000-BB (yes the 2.77 ratio)out of a 2015 SHO with 52k on it ordered. Also have a 92k PP motor from a 2015 sho on order. Picking up a 50k mile PTU as well, non PP version.

I decided to go with the PP motor for the stronger piston setup, and they were more readily available then a 2010-2012 setup. Plan to just switch the oil filter housing from the old motor to the new as I will not be running an oil cooler (Yes yes, I'm an ACC kinda guy lol). Engine will go on the stand and get a new timing chain set, water pump, and HV oil pump from Melling's before the engine gets installed in the car. I am aware of some sensor switching over and a tone ring as well. But fingers crossed for a smooth operation. Biggest hurdle for me will be learning some FORScan so I can make sure the computer and transmission are properly identified and to clear out any tunes that might have been put in the car over the year. Plan is to run stock, I like a sleeper but don't need anything racing oriented.
The ACC should not interfere with the oil cooler. It will "interfere" with the transmission cooler. This is easy to over come with very minor modifications to the transmission cooler. I added the PP transmission cooler to my ACC car in an afternoon.
 

SHO-moco

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The ACC should not interfere with the oil cooler. It will "interfere" with the transmission cooler. This is easy to over come with very minor modifications to the transmission cooler. I added the PP transmission cooler to my ACC car in an afternoon.
Ah that is good to know others out there are able to get the cooler installed and maintain the ACC. I pretty much opted out of the oil cooler/PTU cooler because i have no plans of running any performance mods and no intentions of treating it like a track car. As the water pump design already allows for failure causing water in the engine, I liked the thought of not adding more water possibilities to that equation.
 

Ta2dResqr

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Ah that is good to know others out there are able to get the cooler installed and maintain the ACC. I pretty much opted out of the oil cooler/PTU cooler because i have no plans of running any performance mods and no intentions of treating it like a track car. As the water pump design already allows for failure causing water in the engine, I liked the thought of not adding more water possibilities to that equation.
More water possibilities? There is not water involved with the oil or transmission coolers. The transmission cooler tees into the cooler lines that are already there. This simply allows for more fluid volume and another cooling point (air passing over the fins surrounding the fluid lines). This allows the transmission to maintain a more constant temperature and more fluid to prolong fluid life due to break down and contamination. The oil cooler works on the same principal. I cannot think of an application that uses the coolant/water from the cooling system to cool the oil or transmission fluid. There are cases where the transmission cooler in internal to the radiator (like ours) but, it is still using the air to cool the fluid. It is a separate system with a separate path. A normal transmission operates at 170-225*. Passing it through a coolant that operates at 195* is not going to do much to help it. Oil temperatures are a little bit higher at around 230-260*. This still leaves very little room for cooling.

Even on stock applications, these additional coolers are beneficial for longevity of the fluids and the components they protect. There are 3 separate systems and as such, 3 separate coolers. There is a PTU cooler, a transmission cooler, and an oil cooler. The transmission cooler is the only one near the ACC system. These coolers were all placed on factory cars by the OEM. As such, I would not say that it is an above and beyond performance modification. It is a factory system that is designed to meet the demands of the vehicle especially in the PP platform.
 

SHO-moco

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I have not looked into the paths of these extra coolers or the parts associated with them. I have nightmares about transcoolers through radiators blowing transmissions. think nissan frontiers. All these new radiators and their plastic tanks, I have no faith in them not cracking and cross contaminating. Regardless, those are not things I will be adding to the project at this time. I wont say they will never happen, just not at this time. They do not take priority to me.
 

Ta2dResqr

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I have not looked into the paths of these extra coolers or the parts associated with them. I have nightmares about transcoolers through radiators blowing transmissions. think nissan frontiers. All these new radiators and their plastic tanks, I have no faith in them not cracking and cross contaminating. Regardless, those are not things I will be adding to the project at this time. I wont say they will never happen, just not at this time. They do not take priority to me.
Understandable. Our "base" trans coolers are integrated into our radiators like the frontiers. It is pretty common now days to do that.
 

SHO-moco

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Understandable. Our "base" trans coolers are integrated into our radiators like the frontiers. It is pretty common now days to do that.
I was just doing some light skimming on the oil cooler system. Am I correct that if the motor I am getting has the oil cooler on it all I need to do in order to utilize that cooler is to change out the lower radiator hose? If so, that makes sense to do. Also just tracked my transmission cooling lines. There is a DG1Z-7R081-A "bypass valve" on the car. The lines off of it go to the top of the condenser not the radiator. Is that normal on the 2010's :scratch: . Ok, yet another edit lol. I did some digging through alldata and confirmed that is the oem setup for the 2010. Has the bypass valve with a check valve in it. Fluid circulates through the transmission alone until it hits a temperature that opens the bypass valve sending the fluid through the condenser for cooling.
 
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SHO-moco

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The donor parts have arrived. Need to get this engine torn down to replace the timing chain, water pump, oil pump with new pickup tube, and switch out the valve covers. Will be switching those sensors previously mentioned and the tone ring behind the flex plate. It does have the cooler on it as its supposed to, question is are there casting numbers I can look for to ensure this is a true PP with the better pistons? The vin number on the block matches the vin number on the paperwork for it so that's a step in the right direction. But I'm sure a non PP engine can be updated to an oil cooler, so whos to say this is a true PP engine without casting numbers no?
 

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SHO-moco

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Whelp, there she is. Like that hole? I made it custom ;)
 

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luigisho

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The donor parts have arrived. Need to get this engine torn down to replace the timing chain, water pump, oil pump with new pickup tube, and switch out the valve covers. Will be switching those sensors previously mentioned and the tone ring behind the flex plate. It does have the cooler on it as its supposed to, question is are there casting numbers I can look for to ensure this is a true PP with the better pistons? The vin number on the block matches the vin number on the paperwork for it so that's a step in the right direction. But I'm sure a non PP engine can be updated to an oil cooler, so whos to say this is a true PP engine without casting numbers no?
I guess but that seems really unlikely unless the price point difference makes doing that worth it.
 

yaycandy

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Like the only difference to a pp engine vs a non pp is the valve covers are metal, pcv layout is different and piston top ring is hardened. I put a pp engine in my non pp with help from the quality guy from the engine plant. Shoblock
 

SHO-moco

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Like the only difference to a pp engine vs a non pp is the valve covers are metal, pcv layout is different and piston top ring is hardened. I put a pp engine in my non pp with help from the quality guy from the engine plant. Shoblock
That is how I understood it. The PP has the better pistons and the oil cooler. I was just curious if there were any casting numbers or something to verify its an actual PP motor.
 

yaycandy

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That is how I understood it. The PP has the better pistons and the oil cooler. I was just curious if there were any casting numbers or something to verify its an actual PP motor.
Well the oil cooler can be added. Need the lower rad hose to plumb into it. Pistons are the same. Just the top ring is hardened so they dont grow when the oil is cold and car is floored. Cops dont care if the car is cold, they start it and stomp it. Need the engine to survive so they hardened the top ring so it wont grow a much over temp which is how my non pp engine blew. Top ring butted and shredded the walls. I have a pp oil cooler new in box from ford if you need it. Usually the engines wont come with it unless its a used engine. I had a new pp engine. From my understanding back in 2018 when i blew my non pp engine is that a pp engine has metal valve covers. Black plastic ones indicate a non pp engine.
 
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SHO-moco

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Well the oil cooler can be added. Need the lower rad hose to plumb into it. Pistons are the same. Just the top ring is hardened so they dont grow when the oil is cold and car is floored. Cops dont care if the car is cold, they start it and stomp it. Need the engine to survive so they hardened the top ring so it wont grow a much over temp which is how my non pp engine blew. Top ring butted and shredded the walls. I have a pp oil cooler new in box from ford if you need it. Usually the engines wont come with it unless its a used engine. I had a new pp engine. From my understanding back in 2018 when i blew my non pp engine is that a pp engine has metal valve covers. Black plastic ones indicate a non pp engine.
Ah is that how it goes? I was under the impression that the valve covers went plastic on all the engines, PP and Non , after a certain year. 2013 maybe? My 2010 non PP has the aluminum valve covers which I am going to switch to the used motor I have. Which yes, I have the oil cooler as it came on the used engine. Ok so it looks like I was confusing the timing chain differences that started in 2013. Looks like maybe 2016 (late 15) is when the valve covers went to plastic and they changed up the PCV system. My initial thought was I was going to use my magnesium (thats what everyone seems to refer to them as) covers on the replacement motor. My reason for that was mainly because I have never been a huge fan of the plastic covers. More valve train noise, and easier to crack. But if someone knows a reason why I would want to use the plastic covers please chime in.
 
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SHO-moco

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Ok so I have been doing a bunch of reading and digging through the forums and this is where I think I am at. Right around 2015 the valve covers on these engines were changed over to a plastic design. I believe this change was made for a PCV system revamp. But there was also a TSB about a revised plastic cover for the firewall side. So what came first? The new plastic covers? Or the TSB for replacing the old style Magnesium cover for a revised plastic one? And then on future models they just went all plastic for both heads?

Then there is the next question that arises from the research. If the valve covers were changed in an attempt to revise or improve the PCV system because of all the blow-by and oil build up on the valves, then does it matter to me? By that I mean, I have read that a catch can is pretty much a must and am thinking I have to get the UPR setup. If I am running the UPR setup then does the version of PCV system in the car even matter? Is the UPR really making the difference so that the cars PCV system is less of a factor?

Thoughts on this?
 
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