Power Steering - high pressure hose leak

Discussion in 'V8 - Maintenance & Troubleshooting' started by 98SF19, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. 98SF19

    98SF19 AlphaKennyBuddy

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    Heatshield? Bracket for which bolt? Based on what I have below, I may be getting a new one.

    Warning to anybody looking for replacement O-rings, crush ring, and shaft seal for the Gen3 ps pump . . .
    I got a kit off Rock Auto of various O-rings, a shaft seal, and a small aluminum cylinder. 4 of these should have fit my pump, but only 1 did - the small innermost ring separating the stator disc and the outside of the machined housing shaft bore. The crush ring for the metal (copper?) intake hose bracket was a smidge too large, but still do-able (so I did it). The large o-ring on outside of stator disc was a little too small but seemed to stay on the lip well enough to work (fingers crossed). What I was really interested in with all this was replacing the shaft seal seated behind the bearing. It seemed to be leaking a bit. So I got the one that came with the kit, which was too small, and even a separate one off Rock Auto. Guess what? It was the same size as the other. So I put the old one back in and I'm 50% expecting it to leak within 6 months, especially considering the other rings' fitment issues. However, I did get the Teflon ring on the hard line, and even did some Teflon tape, double over long ways and wrapped about 3 times around (6 layers).
     
  2. 99sho-time

    99sho-time SHO Member

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    The 90 degree bracket that bolts the pressure line to the uim and the fancy heat shield sleeve
     
  3. 98SF19

    98SF19 AlphaKennyBuddy

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    After several tries at starting car with it making prolonged groaning noises (as opposed to the sound of starter spinning while starting), I finally got it running.
    - ok, good -
    Went to check PS pump . . . CRAP!! High pressure line leaking badly from top of pump, about a half cup per minute from what I could see below. So I need a new hose, no doubt, and only option there seems to be Eric's suggestion from experience of using the Duratec version (from gen 3 SLO's I assume?).
    I'm under difficult circumstances as I'm being pressured/threatened by older retired homeowners assoc. residents to no longer work on the car in driveway. But my garage is too full to clear out anytime soon. It's a tough spot, especially since car's not really driveable with curent state of ps.

    QUESTION:
    Is there a problem with just adding epoxy to the top of fitting, let it cure overnight, fill reservoir, and take to shop? I understand that this will permanently affix fitting to steel line, but shop can cut hard line right above fitting to remove it from pump. I think this is a better solution than Lucas stop leak for power steering, which enough well-respected uses have claimed does much more damage than good. Heck, the epoxy may create a long-term solution, until the teflon washer needs replacing.

    Thanks for any feedback
     
  4. 99sho-time

    99sho-time SHO Member

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    I don't see why a little jb weld would hurt. I once did something like this as mine was leaking pretty good worked for a bit. https://imgur.com/NYVkIKa
    [​IMG]
     
  5. 98SF19

    98SF19 AlphaKennyBuddy

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    How long's a bit? :scratch:

    I was able to find the appropriate hose off RA (Edelmann 91979, a name we'll be seeing plenty of on Sunday!) and tonight I cleaned the fitting as well as possible and put on some JB upward into a cone, flush with hex fitting at the base. Will cover this with epoxy tomorrow. This only needs to hold up for a few miles to get to shop, so I think I'll be good. Yes, I'll be bringing a couple quarts of ATF with me.
     
  6. 99sho-time

    99sho-time SHO Member

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    It worked but i had to take it apart one or twice. just jb weld it
     
  7. 98SF19

    98SF19 AlphaKennyBuddy

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    My JB & epoxy sculpture held up! Trip to shop was about 8+ miles. Though I'm usually OCD about letting car warm up, I only gave it a few seconds and then into gear. Had power assist the whole way down. Still had a moderate leak at the threading, which I had teflon taped. I had put a small folded wet rag over pump to avoid fluid spraying, and duct taped it down to wire harness channel cover and wire loom for injector connectors, but still got a ton of smoke from fluid flowing onto front cat. Had 2 extinguishers there just in case.
     
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  8. 98SF19

    98SF19 AlphaKennyBuddy

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    Got feedback from the shop . . .
    They're saying the hose is a 3.5 hour job. (?!??) Another shop had quoted 1.5 hours, which seemed more realistic. I can't really haggle much since I chose to take it there. Also, is there a "switch" at the rack connection? They mention that as being part of the high labor cost.
     
  9. 99sho-time

    99sho-time SHO Member

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    yeah the hose connects through a pressure switch they will drop the rack to get in there its on top of the rack. 1.5 hours is very reasonable.
     
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  10. outatyme357

    outatyme357 New Member

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    I thought I should let the community know about my remix of Paul Nimz's (Thanks Paul!) High pressure power steering line leak fix.

    I forgo the hydraulic hose and use a 3/8 F-M hydraulic swivel adapter instead.

    Tools Required:
    Drill America POU Series 3/8" NPT Tap and Drill Set, 3/8" Carbon Steel NPT Tap and 37/64" HSS Drill Bit w/ 1/2" Shank in Plastic Case
    Century Drill & Tool 98512 Heavy Duty Adjustable Tap Wrench, 3/8-Inch through 1-Inch

    Parts required:
    1 x Brass Tube Fitting, Coupling, 3/8" Compression x 3/8" Female Pipe
    1 x Solid Brass 3/8" to 3/8" NPT Nipple Pipe Connection
    1 x 3/8" NPT Male x 3/8" NPT Female Swivel
    1 x roll of teflon thread tape
    1 x Permatex 82180 Ultra Black Maximum Oil Resistance RTV Silicone Gasket Maker
    1 x can of brake parts cleaner
    some paper towels / shop rags

    Cleanliness is KEY during the cutting / tapping process! DON'T let metal get inside the power steering pump, fittings or high pressure line - work smart!

    How to:

    1. Remove serpentine belt
    2. Remove power steering reservoir
    3. Disconnect / unscrew the retention nut holding the High pressure power steering line to the UIM and unscrew the threaded fitting from the pump.
    4. Remove the power steering pump pulley (by sticking a short socket extension through one of the pulley holes and turning the shaft nut with a wrench).
    5. Remove the power steering pump and bracket from the vehicle, (3 x power steering pump bolts (12mm I believe) and 4 x 10mm bracket bolts).
    6. Place the pump in a vice upside down (Banjo fitting threaded port where high pressure line threads in facing the ground) so that when you drill the threads out gravity keeps metal flakes out of the P/S pump.
    7. Slowly drill existing threads out of banjo fitting port - Don't worry if there are still a small amount of threads left.
    8. With discharge port still facing the ground, stick the brake parts cleaner straw up in the smaller hole in the banjo fitting / discharge port and spray a small / medium amount of brake parts cleaner around thread area that you just drilled out (The goal is the wash the metal flakes out of the port).
    9. Release vice and turn the discharge port where it is horizontal to the ground and insert paper towel / shop rag into drilled discharge port with the goal of wiping metal flakes out of port.
    10. Get 3/8 NPT tap and tap wrench and lubricate tap with machine oil / cutting fluid and slowly use back and forth rotational motion to cut new threads (run tap in approximately a half inch or until it bottoms in the banjo fitting - periodically (5 or 6 times) un-thread tap and clean both the tap and the discharge port with the port facing the ground as outlined above with the goal of washing metal flakes OUT OF and not INTO the power steering pump.
    11. Periodically take 3/8 brass swivel fitting and oil the male threads up with machine oil and do a test fit into the discharge port of the pump.

    Keep doing the cleaning, oiling and tapping steps until the tap bottoms out in the discharge port.


    Once threads are cut and you have tested the fit several times and are satisfied:
    De-grease the discharge port threads and the swivel adapter threads using brake parts cleaner and a rag and once free of dirt, metal shavings and oil / cutting fluid open tube of RTV silicone and place a bead around the middle of the male swivel adapter threads or wrap several wraps of Teflon pipe tape around threads and thread swivel adapter into the banjo fitting / discharge port of the power steering pump.

    NOTE: if using RTV to seal the threads, let pump sit for 24-48 hours before reinstalling on vehicle and placing pump into service.

    Re-install pump, bracket and pump pulley on vehicle.

    With pump reinstalled and new swivel adapter threaded in, Wrap both sides of 3/8 Male to Male nipple with several wraps of Teflon pipe tape and thread nipple into female side of 3/8 swivel adapter. Tighten until tight with wrench but do not over tighten!

    Thread 3/8 compression fitting onto top side of 3/8 nipple and tighten until good and tight with wrench but again, Do not over-tighten!

    Move metal high pressure power steering line back into place, position keeper on stud on UIM and estimate where to cut the tube off at - I cut mine about 1 inch behind the un-serviceable threaded fitting using a Dremel tool - be sure not to get metal flakes into the discharge port of pump or leave any inside the cut off line.

    De-burr the end of cut off metal tube, Install compression nut and ferrule up onto the tube, insert tube into top of 3/8 compression fitting until it bottoms out, move ferrule top of fitting where metal tube is inserted and thread on the compression nut onto the fitting by hand - This part can be tricky if the metal line / tube is not perfectly aligned! - once hand threaded, tighten compression nut with wrench and reinstall high pressure line retaining nut onto UIM stud.

    Install power steering reservoir, fill with clean power steering fluid, reinstall serpentine belt and start engine.



    With engine idling, inspect new fittings for leaks:
    If any leaks noted, tighten fittings slightly until leaks stop - If leaks are on the threads of the 3/8 male to male nipple and tightening with engine running will not stop leaks, turn off engine, Take nipple back apart at top of the swivel fitting and wrap threads with more Teflon tape or de-grease threads and use RTV around threads of nipple fitting, re-thread and tighten nipple. Rinse and repeat until everything is tight and tested and does not leak. - Turning the wheel from lock to lock will also build up lots of PSI on these fittings - If they do not leak under high RPM and / or when turning steering wheel back and fourth lock to lock then you are all set!


    Tool Links:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MFG7R5Q/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BY7QB24/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Part Links:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000WTPZ68/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    https://www.amazon.com/Solid-Brass-...pID=41wTVAoA8fL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00INY1QY4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JH0KGV2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1


    20180326_154635.jpg 20180326_154646.jpg
     
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  11. SHOZ123

    SHOZ123 SHO Master

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    I will just add that when tapping NPT threads they are a tapered thread. So if you run the tap too far you loose the seal from the tapered threads. Be very careful and try fit a few times.

    You should not bottom out the fitting and leave a couple threads exposed. This is mainly for reassembly if it needs to be taken apart. Once the fitting is threaded all the way in there is no more thread to deform for the seal.
     
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