Just hit 100k miles

Discussion in 'Generation 4 - General Discusson' started by Wallygator1, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. Wallygator1

    Wallygator1 New Member

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    I have a 2013 PP SHO that just hit 100k on the odometer. I am maniacal about maintenance on the car changing oil every 5k. Also changed trans and PTU fluids. No mods other than CAI. I’ve read many posts about catastrophic failures. Don’t want my car to turn into a giant paperweight. What should I be concerned about blowing up on my car and what can I do to prevent it? Would love to drive this car another year or two and give to my son when he can drive.
     
  2. krewat

    krewat SHO Member

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    Timing chain and water pump would on the top of my list.
     
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  3. SHOdded

    SHOdded SHO Member Supporting Member

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    As with all Fords, fluids would be at the top of my list. The more aggressively a vehicle is driven, the more it falls under Ford's Special Operating Conditions, tho Ford does not say a word about it :) And with forced induction vehicles, always best to assume S.O.C. anyway.

    Coolant and engine oil are vital to the water pump.

    PTU and RDU fluid for the AWD system.

    Transmission fluid for the ... transmission.

    Power steering fluid ... nah, let's skip this one :nut:

    Brake fluid ... yes this still should be flushed regularly, tho hardly anyone mentions it anymore.

    Service the brakes - de-rust and grease the caliper slide pins regularly.

    Check shocks n struts. They do start leaking at some point. If needing replacement, replace strut mounts as well. Motorcraft is #1 quality. If the roads are relatively good, you can go with coilovers ...

    Check suspension - tie rods, control arms, and sway bar end links. Bushings and mounts too. There are now upgrades available for the torque mounts - adds a bit of NVH, but delivers loads of performance.

    Just a few things you could do!
     
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  4. Johnbigdog

    Johnbigdog SHO Member

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    Going forward, Fords recommended brake fluid service is every 3 years.
     
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  5. Jeff2017

    Jeff2017 SHO Member

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    I bought a nifty brake fluid checker off of Amazon. It tells you how much water is in the brake fluid.
     
  6. Wallygator1

    Wallygator1 New Member

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    Thanks everybody for the replies. I figured that water pump and timing chain were going to top the list. Any idea on cost for getting both done at the dealer?
     
  7. Jeff2017

    Jeff2017 SHO Member

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    I have heard that it is 8 hours labor+ parts. ~1500
     
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  8. Billy VK

    Billy VK Member

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    1500-2000 for the water pump and timing chain installed around here.....I have a shop that will do the labor at 600 if I get the parts but I am still trying to come up with a full parts list... ask me how I know.... or why I needed to know.
     
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  9. rubydist

    rubydist SHO Master Staff Member Super Moderators

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    My big question is - do you get any indication that the turbos are going out, or do they just blow up some day? Do you always get oil leakage or oil consumption or lack of boost beforehand, or not always?

    What I've been seeing is that turbos are bad somewhere between 125k and 200k miles, but that's a big spread and I want to know if there are indicators or if we just need to replace them somewhere around 125-150k. Thoughts?
     
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  10. Jeff2017

    Jeff2017 SHO Member

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    I would wait for them to fail. No point in fixing something that isn't broke. That has always been my approach to car maintenance. I avoid the dealer like the plague except for warranty repairs. If you keep fresh oil in the car and don't drive hard all the time, you will prevent and lot of the early failures.
     
  11. SHOdded

    SHOdded SHO Member Supporting Member

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    Biggest/most frequent indicator of turbo failure is blue smoke out the tailpipe, assuming the PCV system is doing its' job.

    You do get oil leaks and you do occasionally get grinding/self-destruct type noises. Leaks are usually from turbo lines, I suppose let go long enough it is possible to starve the bearings, but I cannot find a direct correlation to turbo failure. The noises of course are terminal, and you hope NOT to get those cause if anything gets sucked into the engine ...

    Coolant leaks hardly ever if ever happen on the lines to/from the turbos.

    C Clips do get blown off the wastegate actuator, jury is out if putting a new c clip on is sufficient to fix. Internal wastegate mounting point CAN break, but rarely breaks. I see this break on the 2.0 all the time.
     
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  12. rubydist

    rubydist SHO Master Staff Member Super Moderators

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    so turbo failures are usually seal related so you see leaks or smoke, rather than bearing failures that cause metal parts to get ingested into the engine with no warning?
     
  13. SHOdded

    SHOdded SHO Member Supporting Member

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    Usually yes. Bearings fail from starvation rather than from actual bearing material failure. Like oil line feed leaks, use of oil that has been run too long, etc. The OEM seals are a known weak point for these turbos, I suspect more so in cars with modified intake/exhaust systems.
     
  14. Wallygator1

    Wallygator1 New Member

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    Update on dealer cost for water pump and timing chain cost. They want $3600. Not happening.
     

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