I cannot find a CKS. Anyone know where to find one?

Discussion in 'Gen 1 & 2 - Engine, Exhaust, Drive Line & AC syste' started by Doug Flutie, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. luigisho

    luigisho SHO Member

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    Maybe but often when they fail it is intermittent so a bad reading would be good but a good reading might not necessarily mean it is trouble free.
     
  2. SoCal

    SoCal Bill

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    Still have my old used crank sensors. Some failed, some were working but pulled during 60K.
    I should have marked 'em good or bad.
     
  3. EarlyBroncoGuy

    EarlyBroncoGuy New Member

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    I just did that on the 3.0 that's been sitting on an engine stand for about 20 years (bought the engine years ago for a project and never got around to installing it, now I'm going through it to make sure it runs before I install it in my project car).

    The crank position sensor is a hall effect sensor with 4 wires - power (12v), ground, and 2 PIP signals, one to EEC and one to DIS. The signal it puts out is simply high or low (+12v or ground), depending on whether one of the 3 flags on the shutter wheel is in the gap of the sensor or not.

    Connect +12v (I used a small 12 v battery from an old PC UPS) from the battery to the pigtail connector terminal with the red wire, and the negative side of the battery to the terminal with the light blue wire. I used short test clip leads and paper clips inserted into the pigtail connector terminals.

    Grab your multimeter and attach the negative lead to the negative battery terminal, and use the positive lead to check for DC voltage on both of the other 2 pigtail connector terminals (dark blue, and dark blue w/pink stripe). There should be no voltage present on those terminals UNTIL you put a piece of metal in the sensor gap (if you have the crank pulley and shutter wheel, stick one of the shutters on the wheel into the gap in the sensor. A large steel washer will work, too). With metal in the sensor gap, you should see +12v (or very close to +12v) on both of the signal wire terminals (dark blue and dark blue w/pink stripe wires).

    The same method works for the cam sensor.

    You're testing it at room temperature, so even if it tests OK on the bench it might fail when it's installed on the engine and heats up. You could heat it up somehow on the bench (heat gun, hair dryer, hot plate, etc) and test it while hot to see if that changes things, that's what I plan to do.
     
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  4. EarlyBroncoGuy

    EarlyBroncoGuy New Member

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    If you are able to test them (try the method I posted earlier in this thread) and find some that are working, I'd like to purchase one.
     
  5. BaySHO Performance

    BaySHO Performance SHO Member

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    I've resorted to using old ones. Car will always start after the CPS has dried out even after the water pump has leaked on it, shorting it out and killing the car. Tells me no permanent damage done. I could now kick myself for having thrown away over 60 of them over the years.
     
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  6. Mark Kreutzer

    Mark Kreutzer New Member

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    the ranger crank sensor could probably be used.....if you wired it correctly. The difference is its got two gaps which send the cam and crank postion to the ecu or dis, idk offhand, but it bolts up fine and the lower gap is the same size and location as the sho.
     
  7. Mark Kreutzer

    Mark Kreutzer New Member

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    Depends on if the hall effect sensor signal could be divided without any negative effects. the sho's crank and cam sensors each have two seperate wires for the the dis and pcm, but I just looked up the ranger and the single cid signal wire goes to both on that so it should work....

    I dont feel like taking off the crank pulley again just to test it lol but you could remove one of the crank sensor signal pins from the connector and try using a jumper wire to feed both the dis and pcm?
     
  8. Mark Kreutzer

    Mark Kreutzer New Member

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    the thread that's linked has some great pics comparing the two.
    i just bought a 94 that cranked but wouldn't start w/ the diff sensor installed. upon testing for voltage on the two signal wires when cranking I got 12v on one(sometimes 11v but not the expected 6v average of low/high) and just ground on the other wire....I might have turned it over by hand at that point and got the same result or perhaps that was only after a used sho sensor was installed.

    the sensor i removed had a bb sized chunk of oil?(w enough metal to be magnetic?) built up on the middle part and some evidence of wear on the front+top of the section that goes under the timing vane or whatever. there are holes instead of slots for the bolts so maybe the gap would have been off either way, i didnt check it before removing, but the front of that bottom piece does seem to stick out far enough to either contact the timing gear. that might not cause any issue but possibly...
    its not reading the gaps because theres that narrow strip along the crank timing gear between the vanes?
    [​IMG]
    not sure if removing those would effect integrity or whatnot, dont think theres a way of getting that sensor back any farther in its mounting
     
  9. NoSlo

    NoSlo GoldMember

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    What the heck happened here?? I think it was about five years ago mine went out, and I just had to walk a mile to the the Autozone, and it was under $50. (Replaced while parked on the road, BTW).

    Good to know this is one more part to have your own backup on hand, another part to save out of the wrecking yard along with timing belt tensioners.
     
  10. tompumped

    tompumped SHO Member

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    Then we'd have to run megasquirt and learn how to tune.

    I'm glad I snagged two of these when pep boys still had them last year. I wonder if standard is still making them? I guess we'll find out if their orders get fulfilled through amazon.
     
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  11. zoomlater

    zoomlater SHO Member Supporting Member

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    I got a notice from Amazon the other day saying they don't have a date when my order (from three months ago) would be filled
     
  12. NoSlo

    NoSlo GoldMember

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    It looks like the 1989-1993 Thunderbird S/C and 89-90 Cougar XR7 with identical-looking CKP with shorter wires is also completely gone. Amazon also says "usually ships within 1 to 3 months" for their PC15 (vs SHO's PC17) from Standard Motor Products.

    This was noted Feb 2018, which should have been a warning.

    tbscshop was asking an inflated $209 but are also sold out.

    This is a crime against our cars, although Ford had started "obsolete"ing SHO parts as early as 2000.
     

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