crank position sensor testing

Discussion in 'Gen 1 & 2 - Emergency Issues - Help & Maintenance' started by tery, May 19, 2019.

  1. tery

    tery Silvia survived the purge- summer car

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    Hi Folks,
    Is there a way to test a crank position sensor off the car?? I didn't see any threads in that direction..
    thx
    T
     
  2. blk\blk90

    blk\blk90 SHO Member Supporting Member

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  3. NoSlo

    NoSlo GoldMember

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    [​IMG]

    You can first test for basic faults. Resistance from PIP pins to ground and power should measure over 10kohms. If it is shorted, the sensor or wiring has failed.

    The sensor has a digital converter - the hall effect device in the sensor is used to trigger a switching output. When there is no magnetic field, such as when the vane of the camshaft or crankshaft is blocking magnetic flux from the permanent magnet, the PIP output signal will be 12V, the battery voltage. If instead, there is no vane, and magnetic flux from a permanent magnet is held near the sensor in similar configuration and N-S alignment, the output will switch to zero volts.

    [​IMG]

    One can set up an apparatus that will power the CPS with battery voltage. Then create the pulses, via a magnet attached to a motor that passes by the sensor (only one pole of the magnet will work), or simply flips a bar magnet from north/south as it spins. Then see that the correct PIP signal output pulses are generated, perhaps with an oscilloscope instead of a test light or multimeter. If you don't get the expected output, you'd need to see that your methodology is correct with a known-good sensor.



    There are three crankshaft vanes per revolution, one for each spark pulse, so the pulse rate in normal operation is between 2400 (800 RPM) and 24000 pulses per minute - 40 to 400 pulses per second. Then we need to know if it would operate correctly on a car; the closer you can simulate the crankshaft vanes and magnet, and even engine temperatures, the more likely you'll diagnose a good or bad one.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
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  4. tery

    tery Silvia survived the purge- summer car

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    T H A N K You,
     
  5. EarlyBroncoGuy

    EarlyBroncoGuy New Member

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    I've ordered a crank sensor from a 2.3L in a '90 Ranger to compare with an SHO crank sensor and see what might need to be rewired to be able to use the Ranger crank sensor in an SHO. The Ranger sensor is very similar but has 2 slots, one for the PIP signal and one for the CID signal - the SHO sensor only has one slot, it generates the PIP signal and sends it to both the DIS and the ECU. The CID signal is generated from the cam sensor on SHO's.

    My theory is to find which wire on the Ranger sensor has the PIP signal on it, then take that signal, combine it to the 2 wires in the SHO harness, which will send it to the DIS and the ECU in an SHO. The CID signal will still be generated by the SHO cam sensor.
     
  6. Mark Kreutzer

    Mark Kreutzer New Member

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    even with the wiring change, i still dont think it will read the gaps on the crank because there's that tiny lip between em and the ranger hall effect sensor/magnet stick out prob 1/8" more then the original, and since it mounts to the oil pump the options seem limited.
     
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  7. NoSlo

    NoSlo GoldMember

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    The majority of Ford crankshaft position sensors, especially 1996 and after, appear to be two-wire hall effect sensors without battery power or digital converter - they require a bias voltage of about 2 volts from the PCM, and put out 0.5V AC when pulsing. Completely incompatible.

    With similar wiring, the Ranger CKP has an integrated magnet in the center, and the sensor has two vane slots, each with its own output, with sensors on the top and bottom. This includes the sensor for DIS ignitions on 89-93 Mustang 2.3l, Ranger 2.3L 89-98, Mazda B2300: (Ford/Mazda parts E9TZ6C315A F07E6C315AC F0TZ6C315B, F0TZ6C351A F1TZ6C315A F1TZ6C351A, F4ZZ6C315A F4ZZ6C351A F4ZZ9C351A, ZZMO18082 F0TZ6C315C F27E6C315BA, ZZM018370 PC10 5S1744 SU221 CSS60)

    [​IMG]

    Here is testing this sensor:


    The 2.3L's two hall sensors have quite different timing outputs, as can be seen by the crankshaft hub vanes:

    [​IMG]

    It might be possible to cut off the magnet and bottom sensor, and use the top for both PIP outputs on the SHO, rewiring the connector. However if such a modified sensor was mounted by the two bolts, the gap would be far too wide. One of the two sensors probably responds to reverse N-S magnetic polarity. The signal conversion circuitry is probably the full length of the body, prohibiting this anyway.

    It is possible the SHO's dual PIP outputs are also two-sensors-in-one, not timed the same, side-by-side in the sensor body. There's no literature documenting if this is true, you'd literally have to crack open a bad SHO CKP to see how it is made, or hook a dual-trace oscilloscope up to both PIP outputs (which might be possible on a running car, by tapping wires near "DIS Module" and ECM, since the actual connector is buried.

    I might be able to do the latter, but time would be better spent cold-calling sensor manufacturers to ask WTF??

    Some other two-pin hall effect sensors, like Focus, Econoline 150 have a similar two-bolt body shape, but of course are electrically incompatible, and would take electronics to make the 0V-12V pulses.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
  8. tery

    tery Silvia survived the purge- summer car

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    yeah...thank you very much
     

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